Hotspot Server Installation Guide

I. Creating the Admin Account

[ Skip to Section II if you already have a Less Networks username (and password) that you will use as the administrator account for this hotspot server. ]

1. From any internet connection, go to www.lessnetworks.com
Click the “Sign Up Free” button in the “Benefits” section of the page.
You will be taken to the User Registration form where you will have to pick a username and enter an email address.
In a few minutes, you will receive an email at that email address from Less Networks.
Follow the directions in the email – you will be asked to pick a password for the account.
Remember the username and password – you will need that information to finish installing your Less Networks hotspot.

II. Building the Hotspot Server

[ Skip to Section III if your computer already has Linux, NoCat, and LESS Networks software. ]

1. Power up the computer with a monitor and a keyboard.
Plug the ethernet cable from the network/Internet connection into eth0.
Typically, it’s the NIC “closest” to the bus.
If you aren’t sure, guess and correct later.
[You may need to go into the BIOS/Set Up Menu to set the boot order so that it boots first from the CD Drive.]
2. Place the Less Networks Hotspot Server Installation CD in the CD reader.
Type “ACCEPT” when prompted.
Wait approximately 10 minutes for the Linux and NoCat installation to complete.
[When installation is finished, the system will eject the CD and reboot.]
3. When the system reboots, Linux will perform a multi-point self-diagnostic.
Wait for a login screen to appear.
Login as “root“.
If the equipment is a pre-Built Hotspot Server ordered from Less Networks,
use the password “imag3micr0” [numbers 3 and 0];
otherwise, use the password “foobar“.
Immediately change the password:
[root@localhost root]# passwd

III. Connecting the Hotspot Server to Internet and Wireless Network

<!– [ From this point onward, use ssh (instead of console) to complete the installation. Note that a free ssh client is available for most platforms at http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ ] –>

To connect your Hotspot Server to the internet and wireless network, follow the instructions below for your type of network connection: dynamic (default), static, or PPPoE.

Dynamic Network Connection

[ This is the default type of network connection. ]

Here are the instructions for connecting the Hotspot Server to a dynamic IP (for example, to a firewall/router serving DHCP).

Quick Method for Dynamic

1. After re-booting, Linux will perform a multi-point self-diagnostic.
2. If the self-diagnostic fails at eth0 with reason “network cable unplugged?”:
Move the ethernet cable to the other NIC,
Reboot by holding down CONTROL-ALT-DELETE.
3. If the self-diagnostic succeeds:
You have correctly connected eth0 to the network.
The other NIC is eth1 — mark the NICs appropriately.

4. If you have subsequent problems obtaining an IP address on either NIC:

Please use the Alternative Method below.

Alternative Method for Dynamic

1. Looking for eth0 and eth1:
Use a crossover cable to connect a client computer to either of the NIC ethernet ports on the Hotspot Server.
On the client, do what you would normally do to get a new IP address:
On Windows: “ipconfig /release“, then “ipconfig /renew“.
On Linux: “ifdown eth0“, then “ifup eth0“.
The client should obtain an IP address of the form 192.168.168.xxx (where xxx can be 250 or less).
ssh to 192.168.168.1 (the Hotspot Server) as “root“.
[ Note that a free ssh client is available for most platforms at www.openssh.com ]
If successful, this NIC is eth1 and the other is eth0 — mark them accordingly.
Connect eth0 to the internet via LAN, DSL, cable modem, etc.
If not successful, try the above instructions with the client attached to the ethernet port of the other NIC.
2. Edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to include the following lines:
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
ONBOOT=yes
[ Note that all caps must be used for each word that precedes an equals sign above (e.g., BOOTPROTO) ]
3. Verify that LAN and WAN are working:
Log off the ssh connection.
If the Hotspot Server connects directly to a cable or DSL modem, power cycle the modem.
Reboot the Hotspot Server.
If the self-diagnostic fails at eth0 with the reason “network cable unplugged?”,
move the ethernet cable to the other NIC,
then reboot by holding down CONTROL-ALT-DELETE.
If the self-diagnosic succeeds, then you have found eth0, and the other NIC is eth1.
After reboot is complete, ssh to the Hotspot Server from the client computer.
[root@localhost root]# ping yahoo.com
Success means that both eth0 and eth1 are working.
[ Note that the client computer will not yet show a valid connection to the internet ]

Static Network Connection

1. Looking for eth0 and eth1:
Use a crossover cable to connect a client computer to either of the NIC ethernet ports on the Hotspot Server.
On the client, do what you would normally do to get a new IP address:
On Windows: “ipconfig /release“, then “ipconfig /renew“.
On Linux: “ifdown eth0“, then “ifup eth0“.
The client should obtain an IP address of the form 192.168.168.xxx (where xxx can be 250 or less).
ssh to 192.168.168.1 (the Hotspot Server) as “root“.
[ Note that a free ssh client is available for most platforms at www.openssh.com ]
If successful, this NIC is eth1 and the other is eth0 — mark them accordingly.
Connect eth0 to the internet via LAN, DSL, cable modem, etc.
If not successful, try the above instructions with the client attached to the ethernet port of the other NIC.
2. Using the Hotspot Server ssh connection, edit /etc/resolv.conf to reflect your DNS (“nameserver” settings):
nameserver
nameserver
3. Using the Hotspot Server ssh connection, edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to include the following:
DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=static
ONBOOT=yes
IPADDR=
GATEWAY=
NETMASK=
[ Note that all caps must be used for each word that precedes an equals sign above (e.g., BOOTPROTO) ]
4. Using the Hotspot Server ssh connection, edit /usr/local/nocat/nocat.conf and /opt/less/files_to_be_copied/nocat.conf.tmpl to include the following:
DNSAddr
5. Verify that LAN and WAN are working:
Log off the ssh connection.
If the Hotspot Server connects directly to a cable or DSL modem, power cycle the modem.
Reboot the Hotspot Server.
After reboot is complete, ssh to the Hotspot Server from the client computer.
[root@localhost root]# ping yahoo.com
Success means that both eth0 and eth1 are working.
[ Note that the client computer will not yet show a valid connection to the internet ]

PPPoE Network Connection

[ If you have an Efficient/SBCYahoo 5100B DSL Modem, first read the document at www.midasnetworks.com/5100AB.html ]

1. Looking for eth0 and eth1:
Use a crossover cable to connect a client computer to either of the NIC ethernet ports on the Hotspot Server.
On the client, do what you would normally do to get a new IP address:
On Windows: “ipconfig /release“, then “ipconfig /renew“.
On Linux: “ifdown eth0“, then “ifup eth0“.
The client should obtain an IP address of the form 192.168.168.xxx (where xxx can be 250 or less).
ssh to 192.168.168.1 (the Hotspot Server) as “root“.
[ Note that a free ssh client is available for most platforms at www.openssh.com ]
If successful, this NIC is eth1 and the other is eth0 — mark them accordingly.
Connect eth0 to the internet via LAN, DSL, cable modem, etc.
If not successful, try the above instructions with the client attached to the ethernet port of the other NIC.
2. To connect the Hotspot Server to PPPoE:
Type “adsl-setup” on the command line of the Hotspot Server ssh connection, and answer the questions.
When prompted, you must enter the PPPoE login and password for this DSL line.
When asked about Firewall, set the level to “0“.
Finish by agreeing to change your configuration.
Type “ifup ppp0” on the Hotspot Server command line.
3. Verify that LAN and WAN are working:
Log off the ssh connection.
If the Hotspot Server connects directly to a cable or DSL modem, power cycle the modem.
Reboot the Hotspot Server.
After reboot is complete, ssh to the Hotspot Server from the client computer.
[root@localhost root]# ping yahoo.com
Success means that both eth0 and eth1 are working.
[ Note that the client computer will not yet show a valid connection to the internet ]

IV. Configuring your AP (Access Point)

1. Configure your AP using a wireless client (you will need to associate with the correct SSID) or a wired client.
Do not connect the AP to the Hotspot Server yet.
You may need to login to the AP.
Read the instructions for administering your AP if you have problems connecting to it.
2. Set the SSID of your AP to the name of the Venue. Examples:
AntoniosTexMex
RutaMaya
BDRileys
3. Configure your AP to not serve dhcp [Exact instructions vary by make/model/manufacturer]
sometimes “disable dhcp server
sometimes “Gateway only
4. Connect eth1 of the Hotspot Server to the AP.
If there is a designated WAN port on the AP, DO NOT connect to it.
Use one of the other ports.

V. Setting the Admin Account and Customizing your Hotspot

Complete this step NOW!
Any wireless user can perform this step and lock you out from being able to administer your hotspot.
No user, including you, can access the internet from this hotspot until this step is completed.
1. From a wireless notebook, make a wireless connection to the AP.
You may require the correct SSID from above.
2. With your wireless notebook, launch a browser and try to go to “http://www.google.com“.
In a few seconds, your browser should be redirected to a login page.
3. From your browser, login as “guestadmin” with a password “foobar”.
This should take you to the Welcome page for your new hotspot.
Click the “Finish Installation” link on the left side of the page.
This should take you to the “Customize Your Hotspot” form.
4. To finish installation of your hotspot, follow the steps in www.lessnetworks.com/static/v099/LessADMIN.html
5. Note that this admin account is for customizing your hotspot’s look and feel, deciding who to grant access, etc.
It should not be confused with the Linux login to the hotspot server.

VI. Powering Down the Hotspot Server

1. To safely power-down the Hotspot Server:
ssh to 192.168.168.1 and login as “root“.
Enter the command:
[root@localhost root]# shutdown -h now
Turn off the power when instructed.

VII. Changing Hotspot Server Connection Configuration

1. Dynamic to Static
If you are changing the Hotspot Server connection from Dynamic (default) to Static, follow the instructions in the section on Static Network Connection.
2. Dynamic to PPPoE
If you are changing the Hotspot Server connection from Dynamic (default) to PPPoE, follow the instructions in the section on PPPoE Network Connection.
3. PPPoE to Dynamic
If you are changing the Hotspot Server connection from PPPoE to Dynamic,
Edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to include the following lines:
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
ONBOOT=yes
[ Note that all caps must be used for each word that precedes an equals sign above (e.g., BOOTPROTO) ]
Bring PPPoE down and bring eth0 up:
[root@localhost root]# ifconfig ppp0 down
[root@localhost root]# ifdown pp0
[root@localhost root]# ifconfig eth0 up
[root@localhost root]# ifup eth0
Check that you can ping the outside world.
4. Static to Dynamic
If you are changing the Hotspot Server connection from Static to Dynamic,
Edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to include the following lines:
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
ONBOOT=yes
[ Note that all caps must be used for each word that precedes an equals sign above (e.g., BOOTPROTO) ]

VIII. Basic Troubleshooting

1. The first line of troubleshooting is to restart the networking service:
[root@localhost root]# service network restart
then restart the dhcpd service:
[root@localhost root]# service dhcpd restart
2. At this point you should be able to get captured from your wireless client, login, and go to the internet.
3. Reboot the Hotspot Server and the Access Point
4. Reboot the upstream cable modem / DSL modem / router

About ngengeh

Nama gw ndry

Posted on February 17, 2007, in Belajar, Linux. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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